Posts Tagged ‘Women’

The international community looked the other way while more than 800,000 people were murdered in Rwanda 10 years ago. Now, justice remains elusive and the harsh aftermath of orphans and HIV, psychological scars and physical scarcity threaten to prolong the killing. (more…)

By Susan Allen, M.D., M.P.H.

Over the last 20 years, HIV emerged as the #1 cause of death in African adults, and the Rwanda genocide became the most concentrated mass murder in recorded history. Though one catastrophe surfaced slowly and inexorably while the other smoldered for years before exploding in 1994, the lessons learned are similar. (more…)

By Lindsey Hilsum. London Observer Service. September 10, 1995

KIGALI, Rwanda — “I couldn’t even kill a chicken,” said Paulina Nyiramasuhuko, the minister for women and the family in Rwanda’s ousted Hutu government. (more…)

By Stephanie Urdang
Kigali

For Grace and her daughter Juliette, the anniversary of the April 1994 Rwanda genocide means one thing: they have lived with HIV for a dozen years, and their disease has progressed to AIDS. Grace was among the estimated 250,000 women who were raped at the time and is one of the untold numbers of women who were infected with HIV as a result. Juliette, now eight years old, is also infected. (more…)

By Violet K Dixon[1]

“The genocide was a collective act. What made it possible, what made that final political crime possible was the absence, the erasure of seeing the other, of knowing, of feeling, of being with the other. And when that’s removed, then politics can become genocidal.” –James Orbinski on Rwanda (more…)

By Llezlie L. Green[1]

A. Origins of the Genocide

To much of the general public in the international community, genocide in Rwanda appeared suddenly, with a rapid and horrific surge in violence against the Tutsi minority in 1994. (more…)

By :Sandra Ka Hon Chu and Anne-MArie de Brouwer
In the 100 days of genocide that ravaged the small Central African nation of Rwanda from April until July 1994, about one million Tutsi and Hutu people were killed, and an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 women and girls were raped. According to a United Nations report, rape was the rule, its absence the exception. Sexual violence occurred
everywhere, and no one was spared. (more…)