Posts Tagged ‘Theogene Rudasingwa’

BY MAGNUS MAZIMPAKA–FRIDAY, 01 APRIL 2011

Rwanda’s former spy chief, Patrick Karegyeya, was the chosen as the most qualified person for a United Nations (UN) consultancy job worth US$ 77,000 a month. The problem is that he lied to get it. (more…)

BY MAGNUS MAZIMPAKA–FRIDAY, 18 MARCH 2011

37 men accused of a spate of attacks across Rwanda are alleged FDLR agents (more…)

By BIZIMANA Jean Damascène, LL.D–12 March 2011

It is an established fact: every time genocide is committed, it is followed by its denial.[1] With regard to the genocide against the Tutsi, denial is characterized by two specific aspects. First, it intensifies as each annual commemoration day draws near; then, it takes on changing and innovative forms depending on the times. (more…)

By Willis Shalita

In a spirit of fairness, I have been reading and re-reading this document (Rwanda Briefing), in an attempt to give its authors a fair shake. Alas! Sometimes you have to call a spade a spade. Here goes: (more…)

By Willis Shalita

In his most recent rambling, emotionally charged but childish statement, Theogene Rudasingwa, former Rwanda Ambassador to Washington, and now prominent member and supporter of FDLR, fugitive from justice, he compares  Rwanda to a painted cemetery — ” U RWANDA RUSIGAYE RUSA N’ IRIMBI RISIZE IRANGE.” (more…)

By Maj. Gen Jerome Ngendahimana– Friday, March 11, 2011

When I left FDLR in DRC and came back into Rwanda late in 2003, I remember when Kayumba (then Head of National Security Service- NSS) invited me along with Maj Gen Rwarakabije to his home in Rugando Cell, Kimihurura Sector. (more…)

By Tom Ndahiro

On April 8, 2004, as part of the 10th commemoration of the Tutsi genocide in Rwanda, the President of the International Crisis Group (ICG) Gareth Evans and Stephen Ellis, ICG’s Africa Program Director published an article with a title:  ‘The Rwandan Genocide: Memory Is Not Enough’[1] The article reminds: “Each time such an atrocity happens, we look back wondering, with varying degrees of incomprehension, horror, anger and shame, how we could have let it all happen. And then we let it happen all over again.” The two authors maintain that something more than memory is required if another cataclysmic genocide was not to happen, sooner or later somewhere in world. They recommend “effective action” and also reiterated “the need for vigilance is nowhere greater than in Africa, where a genocidal ideology is far from dead, particularly in Central Africa.” (more…)