Posts Tagged ‘RTLM’

By Madalina Elena Nan–October 4, 2010

“The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.” (more…)

By Jean Mukimbiri

Abstract

Drawing upon a book by J.M. Lecomte on the genocide of the Jews by the Nazi Germans, the author examines the seven stages in the genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda. These stages, which do not necessarily follow one another in time but may overlap, can be classified in the following way: (i) definition of the target group on the basis of some criteria; (ii) registration of the victims; (iii) designation or outward identification of the victims; (iv) restriction and confiscation of goods; (v) exclusion from professions, working activities and means of transportation, among other things; (vi) systematic isolation; (vii) mass extermination. (more…)

By Stephen R.Shalom (From Z Magazine, April 1996, with corrections and footnotes)

For a hundred horrendous days in 1994, genocide took place in the small African country of Rwanda. The term “genocide” has been used with varying degrees of precision, but even under the most demanding definition there is no doubt that the events in Rwanda between April and July 1994 qualified as genocide. (more…)

By H Saussy

A fine red dust floats in the air in Rwanda, the result of the slow attrition of volcanic rock. It permeates your clothes and shows up on your bath-towel. It’s a strangely inorganic trace to find associated with a country whose most potent image in the mind is still, twelve years after the event, the schoolyards and churches carpeted with decomposing victims of an amazingly intense and brutal extermination campaign. (more…)

By Jolyon Mitchell

Prologue

Not long ago I found myself in the back of a battered old car, juddering down a long bumpy road in Rwanda. It was dusty and hot. The journey was longer than expected. We were in search of one particular building. When we finally arrived at the small village of Ntarama, barefoot children dashed out of their houses, waving and laughing at us. It was a relief to get out of the car. I felt shaken up by the journey; but I would be far more shaken by what we found. (more…)

By Cassandra Cotton

In a country where “…radio has become like the voice of God…”1[1], it should come as no surprise that the media, and in particular, the radio, played a central role in an ethnic conflict as bloody as any known in recent history. (more…)

By Jean-Pierre Chrétien

Among the testimonials of participants in the Rwanda genocide gathered by journalist Jean Hatzfeld is this passage: Killing is very discouraging if you must decide to do so yourself … (more…)