Posts Tagged ‘Raphael Lemkin’

By R.J. Rummel

SUMMARY: 1. Introduction. 2. What is genocide? 3. Jurisdiction over the crime of genocide. 4. What is the origin of the term? 5. History of the crime of genocide. 6. Genocide as a sociological concept: a) the legal definition; b) the common definition; c) the general definition. 7. Genocide in history. 8. Causes and conditions of genocide: a) institutions of government; b) context; c) motives; d) stages. 9. Bibliography. (more…)

Genocide is distinguishable from all other crimes by the motivation behind it. Towards the end of the Second World War, when the full horror of the extermination and concentration camps became public knowledge, Winston Churchill stated that the world was being brought face to face with ‘a crime that has no name.’ (more…)

By: Tom Ndahiro

Introduction

Between April and July 1994, the world tried to ignore the annihilation of Tutsi in Rwanda. Today, it is impossible for anyone to forget the genocide. In particular, for survivors – those I call “living victims” – the genocide is a daily reality: it stole their friends and relatives, their plans and aspirations, and continues to haunt them. Raphael Lemkin argued that genocide is coordinated plans to destroy the essential foundations of the life of a group so that it withers and dies like a plant that has suffered blight. Genocide is a crime against all of humankind; against all notions of human civilisation. But it is also a deeply personal crime committed against individuals who re-live the memories of the genocide like a vicious, recurring nightmare. Survivors remain victims of the perpetrators, many of whose ongoing preoccupation is to alter or erase the world’s memory of the genocide. (more…)