Posts Tagged ‘Rape’

By Sue Horton

The 1994 genocide is never far from anyone’s mind in Rwanda. But for some Rwandans it’s a constant horror. (more…)

By Dr. George William Mugwanya in

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

I.    INTRODUCTION

¶ 1         This commentary appraises recent developments in international criminal law, with an emphasis on the jurisprudence engendered by the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (“ICTR” or “Tribunal”) during 2007. It evaluates trends in the ICTR’s jurisprudence during the year 2007 in relation to substantive, procedural and evidentiary aspects of international criminal law. (more…)

By Peter Tonge

Student, Robson Hall Faculty of Law

University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada R3T 2N2 (more…)

By Stephanie Urdang
Kigali

For Grace and her daughter Juliette, the anniversary of the April 1994 Rwanda genocide means one thing: they have lived with HIV for a dozen years, and their disease has progressed to AIDS. Grace was among the estimated 250,000 women who were raped at the time and is one of the untold numbers of women who were infected with HIV as a result. Juliette, now eight years old, is also infected. (more…)

By Violet K Dixon[1]

“The genocide was a collective act. What made it possible, what made that final political crime possible was the absence, the erasure of seeing the other, of knowing, of feeling, of being with the other. And when that’s removed, then politics can become genocidal.” –James Orbinski on Rwanda (more…)

It is no accident that sexual atrocity has found a central place in genocide. Rape not only destroys individuals, but it can be used as a powerful and efficient means to destroy groups as well. The destructive effects of rape on women may be harnessed for the destruction of the women’s racial, ethnic or religious group. (more…)

By :Sandra Ka Hon Chu and Anne-MArie de Brouwer
In the 100 days of genocide that ravaged the small Central African nation of Rwanda from April until July 1994, about one million Tutsi and Hutu people were killed, and an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 women and girls were raped. According to a United Nations report, rape was the rule, its absence the exception. Sexual violence occurred
everywhere, and no one was spared. (more…)