Posts Tagged ‘Media’

We are told that the media must always strive to be objective; that they have to ensure that both sides to the story are told in equal measure. (more…)

Biased information spreads like a virus, it’s toxic, mutates, infects and is potentially life threatening!  It is implicated in some of the worst atrocities in human history from the Holocaust to the Rwandan Genocide. (more…)

By Gad Ntambara

Recent media reports in the UK press of the British Police warning two Rwandan exiles that they were at risk of being assassinated by the Rwandan government sparked more questions than answers as to the motive behind handling such kind of unsubstantiated serious allegation on another state through the media.  (more…)

By Prof. Gerise Herndon–December 5, 2010

Freedom of speech and freedom of the press: for most U.S. citizens, these self-evident ideals form our nation’s foundation. Rwanda, the site of the most efficient genocide in history with a million Tutsis dead after 100 days, complicated how I make sense of those terms. (more…)

By Sophia Kagan 24 April 2008

The Prosecutor v. Nahimana, Barayagwiza and Ngeze, popularly dubbed the Media case, involved the prosecution of three individuals alleged to have been the masterminds behind a media campaign to desensitize the Hutu population and incite them to murder the Tutsi population in Rwanda in 1994. (more…)

By Allan Thompson

Those who work to build the capacity of the media in Rwanda are soon confronted by a conundrum, a sort of journalistic chicken and egg syndrome. Is it possible, or even appropriate, for outside actors to contribute to building the capacity of the media sector in a post-conflict environment where press freedom still faces overwhelming challenges? (more…)

By Howard Adelman

In 1994, between 6 April and mid- July—a period of 99 days of mayhem—approximately 500,000-800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu were slaughtered in Rwanda in a systematically planned genocide. (more…)

By Jolyon Mitchell

Prologue

Not long ago I found myself in the back of a battered old car, juddering down a long bumpy road in Rwanda. It was dusty and hot. The journey was longer than expected. We were in search of one particular building. When we finally arrived at the small village of Ntarama, barefoot children dashed out of their houses, waving and laughing at us. It was a relief to get out of the car. I felt shaken up by the journey; but I would be far more shaken by what we found. (more…)

By Cassandra Cotton

In a country where “…radio has become like the voice of God…”1[1], it should come as no surprise that the media, and in particular, the radio, played a central role in an ethnic conflict as bloody as any known in recent history. (more…)

By Tom Giles

By late afternoon, they looked like water lilies cloaking the river’s surface.

Only when the light reflected off the water did you catch a truer glimpse of them: bodies by the dozen, bloated and obscene, floating together downstream. Bit by bit, you built up a picture of something human in the expanse – a back, an arm, the slope of a neck. (more…)