Posts Tagged ‘Jews’

By KIRSTEN GORUK Herald-Tribune staff
When Yannick Tona first heard that people in Rwanda had starting killing the Tutsi members of the population, he thought that Tutsis were some kind of animal. (more…)

By Tom Ndahiro

Genocide deniers have the same discourse. (more…)

Starting Sunday, people across the country will take time out of the coming week to remember the Holocaust. Whether it is during a special service at a synagogue or church, at an educational museum program, or in the privacy of their own homes — both those with a direct connection to Adolph Hitler’s genocide of 6 million Jews during World War II and those who only know its atrocities from stories told will reflect upon those horrific events and the lives they took as part of the National Days of Remembrance (May 1-8). (more…)

I studied post-conflict development and the aftermath of civil war and genocide during my junior year in Rwanda and Northern Uganda. It was an incredibly eye-opening, transformative and at times difficult experience. I lived with host families while living in both countries. (more…)

By Mike O’Sullivan | Los Angeles
Two of the worst atrocities of the 20th century started in the month of April: the killing of 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman Empire Turkey in 1915 and 1916, and the slaughter of 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in Rwanda in 1994. Scholars and survivors say the process of healing is not easy. (more…)

By Alex Schwartzburg – April 4, 2011

On Wednesday, former Harvard University political science professor Daniel Goldhagen gave a lecture in Shain Library called “Worse Than War: Understanding Genocide and How to Stop It.” For roughly an hour and a half, Goldhagen spoke slowly, in a deep nasal voice, about genocides: how they begin, why they are perpetrated and supposedly—though I think I must have missed it—why they end. (more…)

By Tom Ndahiro

In modern democracies, the judiciary is seen as indispensable to rule of law and protection of rights. The Bangalore Principles of Judicial Conduct, for example, draw attention to “the importance of a competent, independent and impartial judiciary to the protection of human rights.” The Principles, drafted by a UN group to set judicial standards, maintain that the fulfilment of all other rights hinges on the proper administration of justice. (more…)