Posts Tagged ‘French’

By Shua Garfield
In the months preceding the March 2003 US-British-Australian invasion of Iraq, the French government’s opposition received a great deal of publicity. This led to illusions among some anti-war activists that the French rulers represented a progressive alternative to the “Anglo-Saxon” imperialists. (more…)

By: Ndahiro Tom January 2002

One of the many foreign journalists who were in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide concluded that there were no more devils in hell because they were all in Rwanda. (more…)

Interview with S. Courtoux in La Libre (…) with Gérald Papy, 7 August 2008

Verbatim translation from La Libre Belgique

For Sharon Courtoux of the association Survie, France cannot escape its responsibilities any more. She insists on the seriousness of the Mucyo report published in Kigali. (more…)

Billets d’Afrique N° 172, September 9, 2008

Beyond simplistic political interpretations or a so-called orchestration of complicity, the contents of the Rwandan report on French implication in the genocide of 1994 require France to open a broad national debate. (more…)

By Howard W. French, New York Times, 19 February 1997

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — The Zairian government has stepped up a campaign to arm Hutu guerrillas living among the largest population of Rwandan refugees still in Zaire, effectively making human shields of tens of thousands of refugees, according to diplomats and international relief workers. (more…)

By ANNE JOLIS-Bisesero, Rwanda

’I tell you as I saw it,”says Fidéle Simugomwa, a former Hutu-extremist militia chief during the Rwandan genocide, as he sits for an interview with French documentary-maker Serge Farnel. ”The French soldiers were standing on the hill, and firing down at the Tutsi. . . . We had a sign so the French didn’t shoot at us—[we had] leaves on. (more…)

By Tom Ndahiro

On April 8, 2004, as part of the 10th commemoration of the Tutsi genocide in Rwanda, the President of the International Crisis Group (ICG) Gareth Evans and Stephen Ellis, ICG’s Africa Program Director published an article with a title:  ‘The Rwandan Genocide: Memory Is Not Enough’[1] The article reminds: “Each time such an atrocity happens, we look back wondering, with varying degrees of incomprehension, horror, anger and shame, how we could have let it all happen. And then we let it happen all over again.” The two authors maintain that something more than memory is required if another cataclysmic genocide was not to happen, sooner or later somewhere in world. They recommend “effective action” and also reiterated “the need for vigilance is nowhere greater than in Africa, where a genocidal ideology is far from dead, particularly in Central Africa.” (more…)

By: Tom Ndahiro

Introduction

Between April and July 1994, the world tried to ignore the annihilation of Tutsi in Rwanda. Today, it is impossible for anyone to forget the genocide. In particular, for survivors – those I call “living victims” – the genocide is a daily reality: it stole their friends and relatives, their plans and aspirations, and continues to haunt them. Raphael Lemkin argued that genocide is coordinated plans to destroy the essential foundations of the life of a group so that it withers and dies like a plant that has suffered blight. Genocide is a crime against all of humankind; against all notions of human civilisation. But it is also a deeply personal crime committed against individuals who re-live the memories of the genocide like a vicious, recurring nightmare. Survivors remain victims of the perpetrators, many of whose ongoing preoccupation is to alter or erase the world’s memory of the genocide. (more…)