Posts Tagged ‘Crime’

By Dr. George William Mugwanya in

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

I.    INTRODUCTION

¶ 1         This commentary appraises recent developments in international criminal law, with an emphasis on the jurisprudence engendered by the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (“ICTR” or “Tribunal”) during 2007. It evaluates trends in the ICTR’s jurisprudence during the year 2007 in relation to substantive, procedural and evidentiary aspects of international criminal law. (more…)

By Peter Tonge

Student, Robson Hall Faculty of Law

University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada R3T 2N2 (more…)

By: Tom Ndahiro
In June 1994, towards the last weeks of the genocide, Cardinal Roger ETCHEGARAY was sent by Pope John Paul II to Rwanda. During his visit, the Holy See envoy met with several clerics, priests and nuns.
At the Junior Seminary of Butare, Etchegaray met with priests and had discussions with them. During this meeting, Bishop Misago told him that the reason why Tutsi priests were killed was that the population had lost trust in them.
Eyewitnesses told me he then proposed to Cardinal Etchegaray to find another place for Tutsi priests outside Rwanda. Etchegaray never felt outraged by such words! Bishop Misago has confirmed to me that he said this, but claimed it was for their safety! (more…)

By: Tom Ndahiro

Introduction

Between April and July 1994, the world tried to ignore the annihilation of Tutsi in Rwanda. Today, it is impossible for anyone to forget the genocide. In particular, for survivors – those I call “living victims” – the genocide is a daily reality: it stole their friends and relatives, their plans and aspirations, and continues to haunt them. Raphael Lemkin argued that genocide is coordinated plans to destroy the essential foundations of the life of a group so that it withers and dies like a plant that has suffered blight. Genocide is a crime against all of humankind; against all notions of human civilisation. But it is also a deeply personal crime committed against individuals who re-live the memories of the genocide like a vicious, recurring nightmare. Survivors remain victims of the perpetrators, many of whose ongoing preoccupation is to alter or erase the world’s memory of the genocide. (more…)