Posts Tagged ‘Bagosora’

By Madalina Elena Nan–October 4, 2010

“The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.” (more…)

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First published in Intelligence and National Security, Vol.20, No.3, September 2005, pp.440 – 465.

For most of its history the United Nations was reluctant to deal with intelligence, and major powers were reluctant to share intelligence with it. But as the UN’s peacekeeping operations intensified in some of the world’s hot spots in the early 1990s, the UN found it both necessary and wise to create an information analysis capability at UN headquarters in New York. (more…)

By Jean Mukimbiri

Abstract

Drawing upon a book by J.M. Lecomte on the genocide of the Jews by the Nazi Germans, the author examines the seven stages in the genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda. These stages, which do not necessarily follow one another in time but may overlap, can be classified in the following way: (i) definition of the target group on the basis of some criteria; (ii) registration of the victims; (iii) designation or outward identification of the victims; (iv) restriction and confiscation of goods; (v) exclusion from professions, working activities and means of transportation, among other things; (vi) systematic isolation; (vii) mass extermination. (more…)

By Tom Ndahiro

April 7, 2010 was another day to embrace bad memories. I travelled to the Southern province of Rwanda, to a place called Kilinda. I went there with my friends, Senator Valens Munyabagisha and his wife Rose Uwimbabazi. (more…)

By Jean Baptiste Kayigamba –New internationalist, June 2006

As a Tutsi and a genocide survivor, my account here is not neutral, but a deeply personal one. It is a narrative of how I survived an attempt to annihilate all Tutsi in Rwanda and of the events I witnessed first-hand in the lead-up to, and during, the genocide. (more…)

During the early weeks of slaughter international leaders did not use the word “genocide,” as if avoiding the term could eliminate the obligation to confront the crime. (more…)

The Atlantic Monthly | September 2001
by Samantha Power

The author’s exclusive interviews with scores of the participants in the decision-making, together with her analysis of newly declassified documents, yield a chilling narrative of self-serving caution and flaccid will—and countless missed opportunities to mitigate a colossal crime. (more…)