Archive for the ‘Evidence Material’ Category

By Trevor Wilhelm, THE WINDSOR STAR

Post-traumatic stress, suicide attempts and alcohol abuse — even Canada’s most famous soldier was not immune. (more…)

By Megha Mohan–April 8th, 2011 On BBC

Miles from the Rwandan capital Kigali’s centre, tucked between bustling Senegalese and Ghanaian eateries, street butchers, pavement markets and the odd informal cinema, the Gisimba orphanage is not exactly easy to find. (more…)

By Masimba Tafirenyika–From Africa Renewal, April 2011, page 18

A luxury commuter bus pulls up by the kerb to pick up passengers. A young woman quickly jumps in, retrieves a smart card from her wallet and swipes it against a machine next to the driver. A buzzer approves the swipe and the woman takes a seat by the window. (more…)

By Betty Apigian Kessel –April 13, 2011

DETROIT — The reasons were many and varied for attending the Thursday, March 31, opening of what Dallas-based artist Robert Barsamian called “20 Years- Searching for the Answer,” sponsored by the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills and Armenian benefactors in a collaboration with the Holocaust Center and United Michigan Armenian Committee. (more…)

Kigali, Feb 07, 2011 (The New Times/All Africa Global Media via COMTEX)

Rwandan fugitive, Patrick Karegyeya, is reported to be raising an armed force purportedly to help the Somali Transitional Federal Government (TFG), with funding from the United Nations (UN). (more…)

By James Karuhanga

KIGALI – Regional security chiefs, representing the Economic Community of Great Lakes Countries (CEPGL), have disclosed that Rwandan fugitives, Kayumba Nyamwasa and Patrick Karegyeya, have formed a new armed group based in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with the aim of destabilizing the region. (more…)

Pan Butamire–1 April 2011

In 1954 when Rupfure Thomas and Nyirampara Keziya were blessed with the birth of a bouncing baby boy in their remote Nkomero home of south-western Rwanda, in the wildest of their imaginations they had no inkling that this bundle of joy would one day shake the hand of the most powerful man on earth. (more…)

Filed by KOSU News in Art & Life.
April 1, 2011

During the Holocaust, Nazis referred to Jews as rats. Hutus involved in the Rwanda genocide called Tutsis cockroaches. Slave owners throughout history considered slaves subhuman animals. In Less Than Human, David Livingstone Smith argues that it’s important to define and describe dehumanization, because it’s what opens the door for cruelty and genocide.

“We all know, despite what we see in the movies,” Smith tells NPR’s Neal Conan, “that it’s very difficult, psychologically, to kill another human being up close and in cold blood, or to inflict atrocities on them.” So, when it does happen, it can be helpful to understand what it is that allows human beings “to overcome the very deep and natural inhibitions they have against treating other people like game animals or vermin or dangerous predators.”

Rolling Stone recently published photos online of American troops posing with dead Afghans, connected to ongoing court-martial cases of soldiers at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. In addition to posing with the corpses, “these soldiers — called the ‘kill team’ — also took body parts as trophies,” Smith alleges, “which is very often a phenomenon that accompanies the form of dehumanization in which the enemy is seen as game.”

But this is just the latest iteration in a pattern that has unfolded time and again over the course of history. In ancient Chinese, Egyptian and Mesopotamian literature, Smith found repeated references to enemies as subhuman creatures. But it’s not as simple as a comparison. “When people dehumanize others, they actually conceive of them as subhuman creatures,” says Smith. Only then can the process “liberate aggression and exclude the target of aggression from the moral community.”

When the Nazis described Jews as Untermenschen, or subhumans, they didn’t mean it metaphorically, says Smith. “They didn’t mean they were like subhumans. They meant they were literally subhuman.”

Human beings have long conceived of the universe as a hierarchy of value, says Smith, with God at the top and inert matter at the bottom, and everything else in between. That model of the universe “doesn’t make scientific sense,” says Smith, but “nonetheless, for some reason, we continue to conceive of the universe in that fashion, and we relegate nonhuman creatures to a lower position” on the scale.

Then, within the human category, there has historically been a hierarchy. In the 18th century, white Europeans — the architects of the theory — “modestly placed themselves at the very pinnacle.” The lower edges of the category merged with the apes, according to their thinking.

So “sub-Saharan Africans and Native Americans were denizens of the bottom of the human category,” when they were even granted human status. Mostly, they were seen as “soulless animals.” And that dramatic dehumanization made it possible for great atrocities to take place. [Copyright 2011 National Public Radio]

Source: http://kosu.org/2011/04/less-than-human-the-psychology-of-cruelty-31/

The defendant former mayor from Rwanda was also politically active in his German exile. Even the president of the Hutu militia FDLR has supported him. (more…)

By Felix M. NDAHINDA

The Hague Peace Palace – premises of the International Court of Justice among other institutions – hosted on 26th April 2008 a controversial event under the catchy title:   “Conference on Peace and Development in the Great Lakes Region of Africa”. The gathering featured Mr “Hotel Rwanda” Paul Rusesabagina who was made famous worldwide by a 2004 Hollywood movie for his “heroism” in saving lives of more than a thousand peoples during the infamous genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994. (more…)