Archive for May, 2011

May 27, 2011

The Security Council today welcomed the arrests this week of two fugitives wanted by the United Nations tribunals set up to try those responsible for the worst crimes committed during the Balkans conflicts of the 1990s and the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. (more…)

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Since 2004 in the United States and in Canada, Paul Rusesabagina, the man upon whom Don Cheadle’s character in Hotel Rwanda is based, has been celebrated as the Oskar Schindler of the Tutsi genocide. (more…)

By Meisha Perrin, Special to the Orlando Sentinel

Paul Rusesabagina, whose efforts during the 1994 Rwandan genocide were portrayed in the Academy Award nominated film “Hotel Rwanda,” spoke at the University of Central Florida (UCF) Feb. 15 about what it was like to be “face-to-face with the devil” — and ended up being face-to-face with critics and naysayers. (more…)

By Dau Jok and Zack Rosen–May 27, 2011

Editor’s Note: In this space, Penn teammates Dau Jok and Zack Rosen will provide a series of blog updates on their trip to Africa and Dau’s work to start up the Dut Jok Youth Foundation to help his native Sudan. (more…)

By Gad Ntambara

Recent media reports in the UK press of the British Police warning two Rwandan exiles that they were at risk of being assassinated by the Rwandan government sparked more questions than answers as to the motive behind handling such kind of unsubstantiated serious allegation on another state through the media.  (more…)

By Dau Jok and Zack Rosen–Sunday, May 22, 2011

Editor’s Note: In this space, Penn teammates Dau Jok and Zack Rosen will provide a series of blog updates on their trip to Africa and Dau’s work to start up the Dut Jok Youth Foundation to help his native Sudan. For more on the tragic yet inspiring reasons behind Dau’s mission, read Dana O’Neil’s story here. Also make sure to check out the first entry in the blog journal. (more…)

By: Felicien Mwumvaneza

Even when no one heeded their cry, the western media did their best during the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda to inform the world about the tragedy as it unfolded. Since then, they continued to report on Rwanda, albeit losing their much-coveted role of agenda setting due to public admiration of the country’s extraordinary progress and they have since been forced to follow audience interests in reporting about the country. (more…)